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3 Poems About Food

I’m back from a week of vacationing. This year we stayed in Rockaway Beach, OR, home of the Pronto Pup, which claims to have been the first and original corn dog. It was there where we ate corn dogs and fries and soda, and took pictures of each other riding the corn dog ride (think quarter-fed horsey ride, but replace the horse with a 3.5 foot-long corn dog with 2.5 foot-long stick). A white uniform-wearing employee with matching white food-service hat took pictures of all 9 of us (including Briggs, the dog) in front of the Pronto Pup sign before we went our separate ways –  Maki and family driving south, and Mandts plus Mom headed back north.

AND, this morning, for some reason, I wrote three poems about food. Two of them, though probably not complete, are ready enough for public viewing. Please find them under “Poems”: “Have Your Cake and Eat it” and “Lemons”. Enjoy!

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Opposable

This Sunday, the Baha’is of Burien are hosting a Race Unity picnic in Puget Sound Park. I will be in charge of the craft station, which will feature badge/button-making, coloring, and making tissue paper flowers. I will also recite some of my poetry which carries a message of unity in diversity.

I’ll introduce the first poem, “Opposable” with something like the following:

The Baha’i writings tell us that all of humanity must be united.

Baha’u’llah, the founder of the Baha’i Faith, helps us understand how diverse peoples can unite by comparing the world of humanity to the human body. Human beings, no matter how different from each other, are all connected and work toward the same goal, in the same way that all the different parts of the body, no matter how different, are all part of the same organism.

All parts of the body are united not despite their differences, but because of them. Every part of the body has a role to play, and is perfect in its own way.

I would like to recite a poem that helps illustrate this theme of unity in diversity. The title of the poem is “Opposable”

[Please find it under the Poems section above.]

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Stories for Kids and Others

I’ve written a poem – “Ways to Tell a Story”. (Please find it in the “Poems” section above.)

I have what I call a “Sesame Street” mentality, in which many of my poems and songs are written. I call it that in part to soften the blow of some people’s reactions. On more than one occasion I have recited to someone one of my original (often freshly written) pieces, which I consider deep and meaningful, and the reaction has been that it’s good for kids. Not that writings for children can’t be deep and meaningful – it’s just not what I was going for.

Now, as a form of self-defense, I often silently put what I write in the category of “for kids”, though I look for the opportunity to move into into some other, more respected category, depending on how it’s received.

I don’t like that I do that, for a few reasons:

  1. It implies that children’s literature is inferior.
  2. It implies that what I write is not worthwhile if it’s for children (or simple enough for children to appreciate).
  3. It hurts my feelings.

I need to keep writing, appreciating what I create, making it the best it can be, no matter who the audience may be – even if that audience is just me.